Chalk & Wire Guide for Students (Canvas)

This article is intended to assist users accessing Chalk & Wire through a Canvas course. GETTING STARTED: The general process for using Chalk & Wire consists of two steps: Upload your work / add content to the assignment page, which you access through the link in your Canvas course. Submit it to your instructor. Please watch the following very short video, demonstrating the… Read more →

Canvas Course Merge

Why Merge Courses? The purpose is to simplify your life by merging section enrollments into a course so that content may be shared. Generally, but not always, all students in the merged course can see and participate in all of the same content.  If you are uncertain about your end goal or desired results, ask us before submitting this request – we’re… Read more →

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Motivations for Learning & Teaching Online

Post by: David Rice, Associate Professor of English and participant in the Learning Community on Online Teaching & Learning When the topic of online teaching comes up among faculty, inevitably some colleagues question the wisdom of delivering their content online. Though many teachers find the idea of online teaching intriguing or even inspiring, the question “why teach online” is a… Read more →

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Faculty Presence and Student Expectations in Online Learning

Post by: Jennifer Campbell, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Music Education and participant in the Learning Community on Online Teaching & Learning “But how do I get a good grade?” Every instructor has been asked this question by a student, and to boil it down to a single word answer, hopefully we can agree upon, “expectations.” Students are asked to… Read more →

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Threading Voices with VoiceThread

Post By: Daniel Nester, Associate Professor of English and participant in the Learning Community on Online Teaching & Learning Getting students to participate in class discussion remains an evergreen faculty concern. In the classroom, instructors might draw from any number of techniques, from working on the board or breaking up in groups to the classic open-ended Socratic question. Online learning presents… Read more →

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Kick-off conversation…and lots of opportunities!

A new learning community that has formed to explore the opportunities and issues surrounding the broad topic of Online Teaching and Learning met for the first time. I’ll call the group LC:OTL, and we’ll call the meetings gatherings. …I sense much less “pressure” compared to “a traditional committee”…I think that is a huge plus. This open group of practitioners will gather on a… Read more →

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Academic Twitter: is it worth it?

How can academic Twitter be useful?   Networking: Twitter can be useful for academics to identify and connect with global peers. Connecting with authors of texts or other people working in the same field of interest can be very useful and enlightening. Webinar and conference presenters often share their Twitter handles as well as their email addresses, so it can… Read more →

New In-Line Grading

One of the most useful tools in Blackboard for faculty who accept their work digitally is the In-Line Grading functionality. It allows you to look at, annotate, comment and grade student file submissions without leaving the browser. Over this upcoming winter, some changes will be happening with the tool. This article will keep you informed about the changes. What’s changing?… Read more →

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EDUCAUSE Research Snapshot: Online Learning Attitudes

In the spring of 2017, faculty and undergraduate students at The College of Saint Rose were invited to participate in EDUCAUSE technology surveys, giving our institution the opportunity to benchmark its technology attitudes, experiences, and preferences with the global respondent pools and to directly compare between faculty and students. Although there is considerable overlap in student and faculty opinions about technology,… Read more →