Author: Abi Johnson

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Using WebAssign in Canvas

Accreditation and legal guidelines require that the College be able to verify that students who receive academic credit for a course that has an online component are, in fact, the same individuals who completed the coursework. Luckily, we have an easy way to accomplish this with WebAssign! Students’ access to a WebAssign course must occur through the Canvas course. This does not… Read more →

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Canvas Descriptive Links and You!

If you’ve been following my accessibility series, you know that descriptive links are a good way to make content accessible to students using screen readers or other assistive technology, and they make content look snazzier and cleaner to boot. Canvas opens the world of descriptive links up to more than just external website URLs, though: the system lets you create… Read more →

Chalk & Wire Guide for Students (Canvas)

This article is intended to assist users accessing Chalk & Wire through a Canvas course. GETTING STARTED: The general process for using Chalk & Wire consists of two steps: Upload your work / add content to the assignment page, which you access through the link in your Canvas course. Submit it to your instructor. Please watch the following very short video, demonstrating the… Read more →

Canvas Course Merge

Why Merge Courses? The purpose is to simplify your life by merging section enrollments into a course so that content may be shared. Generally, but not always, all students in the merged course can see and participate in all of the same content.  If you are uncertain about your end goal or desired results, ask us before submitting this request – we’re… Read more →

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Faculty Presence and Student Expectations in Online Learning

Post by: Jennifer Campbell, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Music Education and participant in the Learning Community on Online Teaching & Learning “But how do I get a good grade?” Every instructor has been asked this question by a student, and to boil it down to a single word answer, hopefully we can agree upon, “expectations.” Students are asked to… Read more →

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Academic Twitter: is it worth it?

How can academic Twitter be useful?   Networking: Twitter can be useful for academics to identify and connect with global peers. Connecting with authors of texts or other people working in the same field of interest can be very useful and enlightening. Webinar and conference presenters often share their Twitter handles as well as their email addresses, so it can… Read more →

What is Gamification?

We know that there are benefits to harnessing certain elements of games in learning, and we know that there are more and less ideal ways to implement games in the classroom. We also know that there are two common terms for this implementation: gamifying and gameful learning. So, what’s the difference between the two? Deterding, Dixon, Khaled, and Nacke attempted… Read more →

Gamifying/Gameful Learning: Do’s and Don’ts

Gamifying learning and its young, hip child gameful learning are interesting ideas, often executed poorly. We know that the point of including game-like elements (or games themselves) in the classroom is a way to increase motivation and utilize implicit learning skills. What are the basic do’s and don’ts of incorporating these ideas? Do: Use games the way you would assigned… Read more →

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TechSmith Relay Upgrade – Integration, Quizzing, and Analytics, Oh My!

The upgraded TechSmith Relay carries with it a slew of new features, as well as performance improvements on the features you were accustomed to! Some of the features we’re most excited about are Blackboard integration, quizzing, and analytics. For beginners, start by watching the video, “TechSmith Relay in 1 Minute,” then return here to dive in. TechSmith Relay is now integrated… Read more →