Ways of Speaking to Assist the Captioning Process and Ways to Make Your Recorded Lectures Enduring

Ways of Speaking to Assist the Captioning Process and Ways to Make Your Recorded Lectures Enduring

  1. Try not to speak in run-on sentences. Inserting the word “and” in between ideas too frequently can confuse students.
  1. Try to say the main point of a sentence first and then follow it with a modifying clause.

Ex: “There are syllogisms that can produce correct conclusions if given the correct premises.

  1. Try to be more succinct when speaking.

-reduce the use of the word “so”

– eliminate clauses like “by the way”

– instead of saying “in other words,” you can say “or.”

Ex. “There are animals known as cavies, or guinea pigs, that live in South America.”

  1. Read out a new slide title in the form of a complete sentence.

Ex: “Now, let’s discuss the War of 1812”

How to Prepare Lectures for Online and Hybrid Courses

Before the lecture, write three paragraphs that summarize the critical points of the topic. It is important that the topic points are written in complete sentences.

This articulation helps the lecturer have a clear word pattern of how they will express their lecture points. Live captioners and computer algorithms can pick up clearly spoken and well-formed sentences better than sentence fragments and partially-formed ideas. PowerPoint slides with written text are helpful to lecturers and captioners, but are frequently written in sentence fragments and do not serve the purpose of the articulation process.

Recorded Narration

When recording narration, it is important to ensure your recordings are enduring and can be used from semester to semester.

Below are ways to use language that does not date your lecture:

-Leave out references to a test “next Monday” or upcoming due dates.

-Instead of saying “tomorrow” say “next time.”

-Instead of referring to “chapter 2” use “In the segment on World War I…”